GHANA, 2007. Zelia Mohammed, 10, walks home after collecting firewood, in the village of Chaalam in Savelugu-Nanton District in Northern Region. Taking care of her younger sibling and other household tasks keep Zelia out of school. In rural areas, children, especially girls, are responsible for numerous chores, often at the expense of their education. © UNICEF/NYHQ2007-0937/OLIVIER ASSELIN
GHANA, 2007. Zelia Mohammed, 10, walks home after collecting firewood, in the village of Chaalam in Savelugu-Nanton District in Northern Region. Taking care of her younger sibling and other household tasks keep Zelia out of school. In rural areas, children, especially girls, are responsible for numerous chores, often at the expense of their education. © UNICEF/NYHQ2007-0937/OLIVIER ASSELIN

Meltwater Entrepreneurial School of Technology (MEST), East Legon has partnered with UNICEF Ghana to launch the MEST-UNICEF Hackathon, a three-day product development competition that aims to uncover innovations that will serve “hard-to-reach” communities in Ghana.

The programme which will take place from the 15th -17th January, 2014, with the theme “Solving Big Problems Using Little Technology”, will feature over 100 Ghana’s brightest tech minds as participants who will work in teams to develop practical web or mobile applications that address issues ranging from water supply tracking to access to information, and sanitation.

Participants will be joined by guests from the technology and business communities and members of the general public.

“New ideas and technologies are needed to serve the hardest to reach communities in Ghana. UNICEF aims to co-develop innovations that are driven by and suited to the needs of the most vulnerable,” UNICEF Ghana Country Representative, Susan Namondo Ngongi said.

Read the full article on Ventures Africa here

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