A midwife in West Lombok, Indonesia, opening a message on the importance of birth spacing, the first message she received from Info Bidan. Photo credit: Iwan Hasan, UNICEF Indonesia
A midwife in West Lombok, Indonesia, opening a message on the importance of birth spacing, the first message she received from Info Bidan. Photo credit: Iwan Hasan, UNICEF Indonesia

We, UNICEF Indonesia, have published an exciting video about how a simple text message can save lives.

The video illustrates how a simple SMS based technology, in a pilot project called “Info Bidan” which simply means Information for Midwives, has helped 200 midwives in remote villages in Pemalang and West Lombok provide health care information to and improve their counseling with their community. This was the fruit of a collaboration between UNICEF, Ministry of Health, Nokia and PT XL Axiata. Thanks to the three text messages that they received every week for a year, the midwives were proved to have enhanced their knowledge. And in turn, they had also improved their patients’ knowledge on important health issues ranging from nutrition, safe pregnancy and delivery, to early child development.

This is how Defitriani, a Midwife in West Lombok, describes Info Bidan: “From the very start, the text messages I received were very helpful. I was in the middle of a class for mothers and I got 2 text messages and I immediately shared them with the class. They came just in time. Nearly all the mothers understand them and the danger signs in pregnancy. Before we relied on leaflets and had to bring them everywhere. This (shows a mobile phone)… well we just put it in our pocket… and sometimes the women even read the messages themselves!”

Hope you’ll enjoy the video as much as we have enjoyed working with the project!

Iwan Hasan
Communication for Development Specialist
UNICEF Indonesia

Watch the video here

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Read more stories about how UNICEF works with midwives:

Birth cushion designed to meet traditional delivery practices in Uganda

Solar Suitcases make midwives feel comfortable conducting deliveries at night

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