As Indonesia is one of the most disaster prone countries in the world, it is critical to ensure that the community is well prepared for disasters, and that response mechanism are quick, effective and organized. To meet this objective, the UNICEF Indonesia office believes it is important that adolescents and youth were involved in the different stages of emergency preparedness, planning, and response. Thus within the framework of Innovations in Indonesia, the development of an Emergency Toolkit for adolescents in emergencies was conceived of.

The Emergency Kit for adolescents focuses on building their capacity to deal with the psycho-social stress of an emergency and be self-empowered to address the risks associated with youth and adolescents in emergency situations.

Post flooding in Kampung Melayu, one of the Jakarta communities working with UNICEF on the Emergency Kit. A child’s lost and abandoned teddy bear speaks to the unseen of psycho-social stress experienced by youth and adolescents in this community. Photo credit: Jeffrey Hall, UNICEF Indonesia
Post flooding in Kampung Melayu, one of the Jakarta communities working with UNICEF on the Emergency Kit. A child’s lost and abandoned teddy bear speaks to the unseen of psycho-social stress experienced by youth and adolescents in this community. Photo credit: Jeffrey Hall, UNICEF Indonesia

The project is a collaboration with the New York “Circles” Emergency Kit team, UNICEF Indonesia Education cluster, and two youth organizations here in Jakarta – MDMC and PMI. One of the key aspects of the kit is to develop the adolescents’ capacity to be active in preparing for and responding to an emergency. The goal is to do this by giving them skills, methods and tools to create their own adolescent support system through creating “Circles” and Human Centred Design methods to create their own solutions. The first phase of the developing the youth and adolescent’s capacity was applying the “Circles” methodology. During this phase of the project, it was necessary to document the process.

The documentation need provided a great opportunity to introduce Human Centred Design methods in a focused, actionable way.

To do this I designed a workshop focused on photographic documentation and simple storytelling. To collect and manage the documentation we created a Facebook account and added the facilitators to it.

The Facebook account page used by the youth facilitators to document and tell stories of their progress with their adolescent groups. Source: https://www.facebook.com/lingkaran.remaja
The Facebook account page used by the youth facilitators to document and tell stories of their progress with their adolescent groups. Source: https://www.facebook.com/lingkaran.remaja

The youth facilitators have over the weeks of utilizing the Circles Emergency Kit have taken some fantastic pictures and stories tracking the progress of the adolescents.

Facebook photos and stories of developing Emergency capacity with the adolescents.
Facebook photos and stories of developing Emergency capacity with the adolescents.
Facebook photos and stories of developing Emergency capacity with the adolescents.
Facebook photos and stories of developing Emergency capacity with the adolescents.

Going forward, we are soon entering the Take Action phase of the Circles Emergency Kit. This next phase will leverage the newly developed adolescent groups to apply critical thinking and collaborative methods for problem solving, like brainstorming, and ethnographic research to empower the adolescents to create their own solutions. Check back soon for the results!

Jeffrey Hall
UNICEF Indonesia Innovation Lead

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