Creators of the AguaPallet, Moira Craill and Shaun Craill from LoooP Creative Ltd, New Zealand. Photo credit: LoooP Creative Ltd
Creators of the AguaPallet, Moira Craill and Shaun Craill from LoooP Creative Ltd, New Zealand. Photo credit: LoooP Creative Ltd

In preparation for their trip this week to Chile, we checked in with the AguaPallet team for some more info about themselves and the AguaPallet, and what they were excited about in their upcoming visit. They shared some thoughts about what the First 72 Hours competition has meant to them and why they feel their solution is a force for change​.

The AguaPallet team impressed me in their initial mentoring interview with their focussed problem solving and their experiential understanding of emergency contexts. On top of that, Shaun and Moira had that great, can-do Kiwi disposition, and were very open to suggestions on how to improve their model and design. I’m really looking forward to seeing them in Santiago and getting an AguaPallet prototype out into communities – hopefully they’ll let me ride on it.​

Mac Glovinsky
Lead of Innovation in Humanitarian Action, UNICEF NYHQ

Early conceptual 1:10 scale models of the AguaPallet investigating handle options. Credit: LoooP Creative Ltd
Early conceptual 1:10 scale models of the AguaPallet investigating handle options. Credit: LoooP Creative Ltd

What are you most excited about for the trip to Chile?

I’m looking forward to meeting and working with a bigger team that wants to make a positive change, and has the skills and experience to make it really happen. I’m looking forward to getting a full size AguaPallet prototype built, because once you have that you can start making good design decisions about what works, what doesn’t, and how to make improvements.

What key aspects of your project do you hope to strengthen while working with specialists from the areas of entrepreneurship and emergency?

Emergency response knowledge and field experience is something we don’t have and having access to those people is brilliant. It is going to be critical to getting the design right for each of the end users. We also need help from the Socialab and UNICEF teams to create an entrepreneurial business model that will get the AguaPallet made in sufficient quantities to have real impact.

Why did you decide to participate in a competition focusing on helping children and families in emergencies?

We saw people in distress on the news. As product designers and parents, we wanted to come up with a solution to help. Our family’s experience of the earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand, certainly gave us the motivation. This competition enabled us to get direct access to the right people with the right experience and resources to get our idea implemented, so the decision to enter was very easy.

Moira Craill and Shaun Craill working together on their AguaPallet. Photo credit: LoooP Creative Ltd
Moira Craill and Shaun Craill working together on their AguaPallet. Photo credit: LoooP Creative Ltd

What do you think we can do as adults to best pave the way for children to grow in a healthy, loving and just environments?

Give them your time and the time for them to be kids. Teach them to be creative so they can find solutions. There is nothing more satisfying as a parent then listening to your children’s laughter or see them proud of their own accomplishments.

Why I believe my project is a force for change?

By reducing the time used in collecting water, the AguaPallet creates opportunities that would allow children and women to be educated, to build better social environments and give kids time to play.

“Truly wonderful the mind of a child is” – Yoda

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