Original article published on 12 November 2015 on The Daily Mail. Written by Stacy Liberatore for Dailymail.com. To read the original article, click here.

  • Kushi Baby and SoaPen announced as winners in the ‘Wearables for Good’ and both teams were awarded $15,000 to assist with production
  • The challenge had 2,000 registrants that submitted 250 design submissions
  • Kushi Baby is a necklace that stores immunization records for children
  • SoaPen is in the form of a soap-crayon that encourages hand washing

A necklace that stores two years of immunization records and a soap pen that encourages better hygiene among three to six year olds have been revealed as winners in a new ‘Wearables for Good’ challenge.

Unicef, Arm Holdings and frog joined forces to host the event, which attracted 2,000 registrants from 65 countries that resulted in 250 design submissions.

Kushi Baby and SoaPen, the two winners both left with a $15,000 prize and now hope to commercialise their ideas.

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Today, a necklace that stores two-years of personal immunization records for children and a soap pen that encourages better hygiene among three to six year olds were named winners of the ‘Wearables for Good’ challenge. Kushi Baby (featured left) and SoaPen (featured right) took home the winning prize of $15,000.

Not only did both teams receive prize money to assist with the production of their devices, they will also be mentored by the event partners.

Kushi Baby uses a mobile app for community health workers that interfaces with a digital necklace worn by patients via Near Field Communication (NFC).

Healthcare workers scan the chip and can read, act upon and update health records, without the need of connectivity to a central database.

‘Khushi Baby wants to ensure that all infants have access to informed and timely health care by owning a copy of their medical history’, Ruchit Nagar, co-founder of Kushi Baby, said.

THE CRAYON THAT DOUBLES AS SOAP

The personal tool encourages children from ages three to six years old to wash their hands regularly. Teachers and parents can use the hygiene tool to draw or write on a child’s skin, which makes the act of hand washing more fun, while reducing the spread of disease.

soapen
Not only did both teams receive prize money to assist with the production of their devices, they will also be given mentoring from the event partners.Winners were announced at SLUSH, a 15,000+ person start-up and technology event in Helsinki, Finland, and at ARM TechCon, a high-tech event for software and hardware developers in Santa Clara, California.

SoaPen has a screw on cap, which loops in a string allowing the user to easily carry it by wearing it around their neck, wrist or tying it to their backpack.

The packaging carries informative illustrations to educate parents about the critical areas to be marked and the importance of hand washing.

SoaPen has a screw on cap, which loops in a string allowing the user to easily carry it by wearing it around their neck, wrist or tying it to their backpack.

The packaging carries informative illustrations to educate parents about the critical areas to be marked and the importance of handwashing.

‘The Khushi Baby system enables access to culturally appropriate wearable digital medical records, even in the most remote and isolated areas.’

With the prize money, the team plans to expand from monitoring the vaccination progress of 1,000 children in 100 villages to a larger beneficiary base in areas beyond India where its digital system can streamline access and delivery to health care.

Khushi Baby also has hopes of buildings its systems server to broader populations and medical applications.

KHUSHI BABY- A SMART NECKLACE FOR BABIES

Kushi Baby uses a mobile app for community health workers that interfaces with a digital necklace worn by patients via Near Field Communication (NFC).

Healthcare workers scan the chip and can read, act upon and update health records, without the need of connectivity to a central database.

The patient data is later synced to the cloud and displayed on an analytics dashboard, where insights can be acted upon by health officials.

More than just another approach to digitize the record keeping process, the Khushi Baby system presents a novel community engagement platform

The company combined tradition with technology by transforming the kaala dhaago or black thread that is traditionally worn by children to protect them from nazar or the evil eye into a medical passport.

SoaPen is a crayon-like soap that combines engagement with hygiene.

The personal tool encourages children from ages three to six years old to wash their hands regularly.

Teachers and parents can use the hygiene tool to draw or write on a child’s skin, which makes the act of hand washing more fun, while reducing the spread of disease.

‘We believe that a serious problem can be solved through a simple and fun solution,’said Shubham Issar, a creator of SoaPen.

soape
SoaPen is a crayon-like soap that combines engagement with hygiene. The personal tool encourages children from ages three to six years old to get in the habit of regularly washing their hands. Teachers and parents can draw or write on a child’s skin to make the act of hand washing more fun, while reducing the spread of disease.

‘Our focus is to reduce infant mortality rates and the spread of disease by promoting the habit of hand washing with soap among children.’

‘SoaPen taps into the power of the two directional awareness flow between adults and children all over the world, with the aim to reach as many hands as fast as possible.’

Winners were announced at SLUSH, a 15,000+ person start-up and technology event in Helsinki, Finland, and at ARM TechCon, a high-tech event for software and hardware developers in Santa Clara, California.

Simon Segars, CEO of ARM said: ‘By using readily available technologies, all of the finalists showed us how incredibly simple ideas can have the potential to be transformative.’

Communication (NFC). Healthcare workers scan the chip and can read, act upon and update health records, without the need of connectivity to a central database.
Communication (NFC). Healthcare workers scan the chip and can read, act upon and update health records, without the need of connectivity to a central database.

Denise Gershbein, Executive Creative Director of frog said: ‘We wanted to elevate wearable and sensor technology in a way that moves beyond fitness trackers on the wrist and towards improving the lives of mothers and children across the world.

‘ We are extremely pleased with the dialogue that has resulted from this effort, and truly humbled and impressed by the solutions generated by the winners.

‘We look forward to seeing real impact in the world from these ideas.’

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